Faculty Podcasts

EPISODE 1

“Political Marketing in the Canadian and US Elections” featuring Dr. Jamie Gillies

In these excerpts from a longer conversation, Dr. Jamie Gillies discusses the results of two recent book projects: Political Marketing in the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election (2017), and Political Marketing in the 2019 Canadian Federal Election (2020). Noting both commonalities and differences between U.S. and Canadian marketing as political strategies, Jamie provides valuable insights into the changing nature of North American political campaigns and their embrace of ongoing technological and social media developments.

EXTENDED VERSION

“Political Marketing, Twin Peaks, Mastering Engineers, and Other Research Obsessions” featuring Dr. Jamie Gillies

In this extended conversation, Dr. Jamie Gillies discusses a wide range of existing and emerging research interests, beginning with a wide-ranging comparative discussion of political marketing strategies in U.S. and Canadian federal election campaigns. Having edited two collections of essays on this topic, and hard at work on a third, Jamie provides fascinating insights into the nature of marketing as a distinct element of party-based political strategies, an element that must be attentive to changing trends in social media and technology. Jamie goes on to discuss the political themes and issues apparent in the critically-acclaimed television program Twin Peaks, as well as his most recent research interest in the recording industry, and specifically the role of mastering engineers in the music production process.

EPISODE 2

“The Place of the Ford Falcon in Argentine History” featuring Dr. Karen Robert

In these excerpts from a longer conversation, Dr. Karen Robert discusses her nearly-complete book project entitled “Driving Terror: Labour, Violence, and Memory at Ford Argentina”. The book explores the Ford Falcon automobile as both beloved cultural icon and instrument of terror under Argentina’s military junta in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and what this reveals about industrialization, labour, and human rights in mid-Cold War Latin America.

EXTENDED VERSION

“The Ford Falcon, Automobility, and Mindfulness in the University Classroom” featuring Dr. Karen Robert

In a wide-ranging conversation, Dr. Karen Robert discusses her long-standing research project on the place of the Ford Falcon in Argentine history. The Falcon became an icon of Argentina’s industrial development in the 1960s, but also took on terrifying and sinister connotations as a vehicle of choice for disappearances under the country’s military dictatorship in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Karen has examined not only the historical aspects of this period, but also much more contemporary legal and human rights cases in which the Ford Falcon was a central character. She also discusses the larger scholarly literature around “automobility”, as well as her future plans for incorporating contemplative practices in her history classrooms to help students to process the content about which they are learning.

EPISODE 3

“Identity, Belonging, and Diasporic Citizenship” featuring Dr. Gül Çalışkan   

In these highlights from a conversation from June 2021, Dr. Gül Çalışkan discusses some of her long-standing research interests on the lived experiences of Turkish migrants in Berlin. Exploring the politics of hospitality and hostility in relation to migrant “outsiders”, as well as “homesickness” and “homelessness” in relation to various ways of belonging, Gül develops an elegant analysis of diasporic citizenship as a sophisticated framework for understanding transnational mobility in the early 21st century. Gül then expands upon these ideas to situate her approach to Global Sociology as well as her current research on new migrants to Fredericton, New Brunswick.

EXTENDED VERSION

In this conversation from June 2021, Dr. Gül Çalışkan provides a detailed overview of a wide range of her research interests. Her PhD research on the lived experiences of Turkish migrants in Berlin, updated with recent follow-up interviews with her original research collaborators, is about to be published as a book with the University of British Columbia Press. Exploring the politics of hospitality and hostility in relation to migrant “outsiders”, as well as “homesickness” and “homelessness” in relation to various ways of belonging, Gül develops an elegant analysis of diasporic citizenship as a sophisticated framework for understanding transnational mobility in the early 21st century. Gül then expands upon these ideas to situate her approach to Global Sociology as well as her current research on new migrants to Fredericton, New Brunswick.

EPISODE 4

“Law and Consent: Contesting the Common Sense” featuring Dr. Karla O’Regan 

In these highlights from a September 2021 conversation, Dr. Karla O’Regan discusses the legal concept of consent and its relationship to notions of personal autonomy. Her recent book, Law and Consent: Contesting the Common Sense (Routledge, 2020), challenges prevailing understandings of consent-as-autonomy through detailed examinations of contexts in which the legal regulation of the body took other forms: sex in Classical Athens and Rome; the doctor-patient relationship in Medieval Europe; and the oversight of bodily harm in modern professional sports. These case studies provide alternative narratives where our current common-sense idea of consent as personal autonomy does not apply as readily, and which therefore provide an analytical space for scrutinizing consent-as-autonomy more broadly. The conversation then turns to how a more nuanced understanding of consent can inform contemporary legal practice.

EXTENDED VERSION

In a conversation from September 2021, Dr. Karla O’Regan discusses her recently-published book, Law and Consent: Contesting the Common Sense (Routledge, 2020). The book is an in-depth exploration of how the concept of consent has developed in legal practice and legal scholarship, in particular the understanding that consent is inherently linked to personal autonomy. In an effort to defamiliarize this common-sensical understanding, Karla adopted a method derived from Foucault’s genealogical, “history-of-the-present” approach, whereby familiar concepts are defamiliarized by examining them in unfamiliar context. In her book, Karla provides detailed case studies of the concept of sexual consent in Ancient Greece and Rome, medical consent in Medieval Europe, and consent surrounding bodily harm in professional sports. These case studies provide alternative narratives where our current common-sense idea of consent as personal autonomy does not apply as readily, and which therefore provide an analytical space for scrutinizing consent-as-autonomy more broadly. The conversation then turns to how a more nuanced understanding of consent can inform contemporary legal practice.

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